National 60+/70+
County Cricket Championship

Vice Presidents
Scyld Berry, Henry Blofeld, Roland Butcher, Paul Farbrace, Barry Hearn OBE, Sir Tim Rice


Features
Play Cricket Help and Guidelines
Championship Play Cricket Website
England Seniors Play Cricket Website
Fixtures
Results
Group Tables
Play Offs / Phase 2 Fixtures & Results
End of Season Statistics
Special Player Registrations
England 60+ News Page
England 70+ News Page
England Seniors Historic Records
Committee Members & County Contacts
AGM & Committee Meeting Minutes
Regional Groups Minutes
60+ History and Roll of Honour
70+ History and Roll of Honour
Former 60+ Home Counties History
Historical Playing Records
Constitution, Rules and Regulations
Prostate Cancer Fund Raising
Sponsors
County Tours
Obituaries

GDPR Privacy Statement


Previous Years

England 60+ Internationals 2024

20/03/2024

We are back from a successful World Cup campaign and now looking forward to a busy 2024 .

We have the following schedule being organised:

Trial Games
Scotland  2 OD’s at Marton CC and Hartlepool CC on 30th & 31st May Wales 11th June Ground to be arranged The Vatican CC either Saturday 29th / Sunday 30th June
Pakistan   5 ODI’s and 2 games against Counties 6th to 19th July
India  awaiting confirmation of dates  July / August

We are also organising a tour to Australia to defend the Grey Ashes November/ December 2024

In order to ensure we look at all nominations for the 2024 season please can you forward your county recommendations to the following e mail addresses by March 31st .

[email protected]
[email protected]

On behalf of the the International Committee

World Cup Updates

01/03/2024

Four Englishmen named in the IMC Over 60s World Cup Team of the Tournament

Players Steve Aston, Montie Douglas and Marcus Young alongside manager Paul Bradley were recognised at the closing ceremony of the International Masters Cricket Over 60s World Cup on March 3rd

On the run to the final, Aston was a regular behind the stumps totalling 15 dismissals with 11 of those coming in the form of stumpings. He also contributed 88 runs with bat in hand including a vital 73 in the opening game against New Zealand.

Meanwhile, Douglas became one of the stars of the tournament as he unfurled three consecutive centuries during the group stages. On his first appearance in the tournament, he made 114 against Canada before following that up with an unbeaten 106 against Zimbabwe. Four days later on his next appearance the right handed batter would make 104* against South Africa. A half-century in the final also followed to round off a fine tournament.

Working his magic with ball in hand was Marcus Young. He finished with 10 wickets including seven in the opening two encounters against New Zealand and Canada with his best figures of 4-49 coming in the game against the Canadians. In that same match he took a superb diving one handed catch off his bowling to dent Canada’s hopes in the run chase.

Finally, Bradley was instrumental in the organisation of the tour and smooth running once the team had landed in India and was rewarded with his own place in the team.

IMC Over 60s World Cup Team of the Tournament
Peter Jensen (Australia, Captain), Craig Gibb (New Zealand), Darren Smith (Australia), Montie Douglas (England), Deonarine Dayal (West Indies), Tony Bennett (Rest of the World), Bill Blair (Australia), Zamin Amin (West Indies), Steve Aston (England), Tony Panecasio (Australia), Marcus Young (England), Lal Ranasinghe (Sri Lanka), Jeevaka Weerasinghe (USA), Stuart Carpenter (Wales), Subash Chatterjee (India), Trevor Poole (South Africa), Paul Bradley (England, Manager).

Australia beat England in the 60+ World Cup Final by 8 wickets

Full scorcard Via This Link 

England v Australia – Men’s Over 60 Cricket World Cup Final – Friday 1st March 2024

SRI Ramachandra Medical College Cricket Ground - Chennai

Match report by Rash Mahmood

England’s hopes of being crowned World Champions were smothered on a sultry, sweltering afternoon in Chennai, as they succumbed to their arch rivals Australia in a one sided final.

England had reached the final, winning every one of their games, with the Australians only losing one match, as the two best teams in the competition went head-to-head to be crowned World Champions.

England had hardly been challenged through the group stage, and as a result, there were a number of questions surrounding the fact that a number of the England batters had not had any significant time out in the middle, due to the nature of England’s victories. They would surely be tested by an Australian bowling unit in the event they were called upon.

Australia, after suffering a shock defeat to the West Indies in the group stage, were peaking at the right time, and had the leading wicket taker in the tournament Tony Panecasio. Their ground fielding was the best in the competition, so England knew that they would have to be at their very best to win.

The SRI Ramachandra Ground had seen a lot of runs scored on it, and both teams had played at the ground before, so anticipation amongst the spectators was for a high scoring and entertaining game, between two teams who knew each other well, and who had met on no less than eight occasions during the previous year, in the Carib Cup, the Grey Ashes and the Canada Cup. On a hazy, sticky morning, England skipper Richard Merriman won the toss and elected to bat, which took the local commentators and those who play on the ground regularly by surprise. There was some cloud cover, the pitch had retained a bit of moisture from watering and there were tinges of green and significant cracks on the wicket surface, that should in theory help the bowlers in the first hour or so of play and make batting tricky. Conditions for batting would get much easier as the day wore on.

England named an unchanged side from the one that beat Sri Lanka by six wickets two days previously, and it was the skipper Merriman together with Nick Gaywood who opened the innings for England.

From the off, Gaywood looked to go on the attack, and any assistance the Australians may have had early on, were negated by some wonderful strokes from Gaywood, whose first four scoring shots were: 4,4,1,6.

England were going along at a good rate and were 46/0 in the middle of the seventh over, when Gaywood tried to play a ball from Pete Judd into the leg side, and missed it, the ball striking his pad right in front, giving umpire Martin Wale a very easy decision to make. Gaywood out for a very entertaining 33, but he will feel that the way he was playing, he missed out on a big score.

Montie Douglas made his way to the middle, and hopes would have been high in the England camp as he did so. Douglas had already made three centuries in the tournament and was in such good form that another strong showing from him was on the cards.

Merriman and Douglas had batted well together in the tournament so far, and their partnership started off brightly, Douglas playing in his normal manner, scoring at a run a ball as he had done throughout the tournament. Merriman was content to play the anchor role, but as the partnership continued, some excellent bowling from Judd, Darren Smith and Pete Jackson, combined with superb ground fielding and captaincy by Peter Jensen had England at 104/1 at the halfway stage, England still going at 4.5 runs per over, but with a par score at the SRI Ramachandra being 250 - 260, England knew that the second half of the innings would need some impetus.

Merriman brought up his 50 in the 27th over off 72 balls, but in the very next over, he was caught by Judd at long-on off the bowling of David Wenham for 53, England now 131/2.

A change in the batting line up, saw Nick Newman promoted after he and Douglas had shared a 150 plus run partnership at the ground against South Africa, with both making centuries. Presumably, with England needing to press on, this seemed a sensible idea, but unfortunately for England, this backfired as Newman was out LBW to Bill Blair in the next over to the first ball he faced, England 132/3.

At the mandatory drinks break at 30 overs, England were on 140/3. Douglas a few balls before the break, seemed to tweak his knee, and his normally high scoring rate had reduced significantly. He was 45 not out off 72 balls, with Mel Hussain three not out off of four balls.

The Australians would have been much the happier of the two sides at the drinks break. Some excellent bowling and fielding had England struggling to score heavily, and the pressure was starting to tell. Jensen the Australian skipper sensed that now was the time to squeeze the England batting effort, and what transpired was a captaincy masterclass, aided and abetted by some tremendous bowling and fielding, that England simply had no answers to.

Douglas, who was still not looking 100%, did bring up his 50 with a marvellous shot for six over long-on, but the first ball of the 34th over brought about his wicket, and what a wicket it was. Panecasio had replaced the excellent Blair at the hostel end, and with Douglas knowing England had to start to score heavily, tried to hit the first ball down the ground. He got underneath it, and the ball went high into the air. Panecasio, looking straight into the sun, ran backwards, colliding with the stumps, appearing to lose sight of the ball twice, but at the last minute, seemed to regain it, and stuck out his hands, with the ball dropping into them. It was a wonderful catch, and Douglas left the wicket shaking his head in disbelief, England now were 167/4, with Douglas making 56 off 81 balls.

More brilliant Australian fielding in the very next over, had another England batter trudging back to the pavilion, this time Steve Aston, was out for one, run out by an excellent gather and throw from Graeme Pavey, fielding at cover, who had one stump to aim at and hit cleanly, Aston well out of his ground. England now reeling on 168/5, the Australians were clearly determined to not let England get anywhere near 250 runs.

Hussain had been trying to force the runs, and had been going along quite nicely, when he charged down the pitch to a turning delivery from Panecasio and was left floundering on the ground as the Australian wicket keeper Orlando, gathered smartly and removed the bails, Hussain out for 24 of 28 balls, reducing England to 183/6 after 38.2 overs.

Graham Shaw was still out in the middle, and had made 10 from the 10 balls he had faced, and England would be hoping he would be there at the end, to get England to a score approaching at least 220, however Panecasio had other ideas, and if the catch he took off his own bowling to dismiss Douglas was a good one, then his reflex catch to dismiss Shaw with the final ball of his over was just as good, if not better. Shaw, a powerful striker of the ball, came down the pitch, and smashed the ball back towards Panecasio at around hip height. Panecasio, stuck out a hand, and the ball stuck, a truly brilliant effort from the bowler, Shaw out for 10, England now 184/7 and in real danger of not seeing their allotted 45 overs out.

Panecasio was in amongst the wickets again in his next over, having Jason Caunt caught at mid-on, Richard Johnston taking an excellent diving catch, Caunt out for two, England 190/8. Phil Deakin and Mike Palmer added some valuable runs for England, but with Deakin out LBW in the final over for 17, England limped to 214/9 off their 45 overs.

In the final 10 overs, England managed to make just 46 runs for the loss of six wickets. It was by far their worst batting display of the tournament, but credit must be given to the Australian bowlers and fielders, under the excellent captaincy of Jensen. It seemed that for every English batsman, there was a fielding plan in place, and the bowlers bowled to that plan. In simple terms, the Australians dared the batters to go big and play expansive shots and were more than happy to give away a few singles as the English batters tried in vain to get to what would be a competitive score. The fears that some of those watching had regarding the England middle/lower order were laid bare in crushingly brutal fashion.

The star of the show for the Australians, was once again, Panecasio, who, having taken six wickets against New Zealand in the semi-final, ended up with another four today, cementing his position as the leading wicket taker in the tournament, however he was backed up by all the other Australian bowlers and fielders, who put on a superb display. The Australian bowling only yielded nine extra runs, three wides and six leg byes, a phenomenal effort in the context of both the game and in the tournament in general, and England would have to bowl to the same high standards if they were to register a famous victory.

England knew that a score of 214 on a wicket that was going to get easier for the Australian batsmen was going to be tough to defend.

Australia opened their innings with the duo of Smith and Peter O’Reilly and as the England openers had done in their innings, the Australian pair started out in similar fashion, racing to 36/0 after seven overs. Both openers largely untroubled, although things could have been very different had England adopted a more positive mindset from the start. Where the Australian bowling and fielding seemed to be operating with a definite plan, the England fielding and bowling seemed to be operating in a more random and haphazard way. In contrast to the discipline the Australians bowled with, England had already given away 11 runs in extras at this point, not something that was going to help their cause.

The England skipper Merriman knew that a breakthrough was vital, but try as he might with different bowlers, the breakthrough did not come, and the Australian openers continued on their way, with little or no pressure being applied to them.

The century stand between Smith and O’Reilly was reached in the 22nd over and Smith reached a fine 50 midway through the innings with the score at 111/0.

England finally made a breakthrough, with Newman clean bowling O’Reilly for 46 in the 26th over, Australia 126/1, and England who had looked downbeat and downcast in the field, suddenly had a spring in their step. One wicket brings two as the saying goes, and the Australian skipper Jensen was the next man out, feathering a catch behind to Aston off the bowling of Jim Phillips, the skipper out without troubling the scorers, leaving Australia on 128/2 after 26.4 overs.

Was the momentum swinging England’s way? Well, if it was, then England failed to take advantage. Pavey was the new man out in the middle for Australia and looked very uncomfortable against the bowling of Newman and Marcus Young. With Pavey clearly struggling to score, there was surely an opportunity for England to go onto the offensive and bring fielders closer in to prevent Pavey from getting easy runs, that would increase his confidence. Unfortunately for England, for whatever reason that never transpired, and the Australian batsmen were able to pick and choose where to place the ball at will, under no pressure whatsoever from the fielders.

England looked disjointed and dejected, and the Australian batters knew it, and continued playing their own game, eventually sauntering through for victory after 41.5 overs, with the winning runs being hit by the excellent Smith, a four through mid-wicket, to leave Australia on 215/2, Smith finishing on 88 not out off 108 balls, and Pavey, who initially looked very uncomfortable, finishing on a very fine 55 not out off just 61 balls.

Australia were very convincing and worthy winners, with Darren Smith being awarded the Player of the Match award.

England will be very disappointed that they played their worst cricket of the tournament in the final. In contrast to the Australians with the ball, England gave away 26 runs in extras, and when defending a low total, that is simply too many free runs to give away.

England will look back on the tournament with some fine memories, but there was a clear gulf in class between the teams today, and England will have some soul searching to do, ahead of a busy summer before England fly out to Australia in November to defend The Ashes.

England have some very talented players within their squad, and for the most part, they all came together to produce some fine cricket, and in this, the last match report by myself, I would like to place my thanks on record to all the members of the squad for their commitment, enthusiasm, drive and determination, to play such a high standard of cricket in very tough and inhospitable conditions.

England will be back, wiser, stronger and with the same belief they had at the start of this tournament. Sometimes, you just have to accept, however, that there will be occasions when, despite your best efforts, you are beaten by a better team, and that is what happened today.

Congratulations to Australia on becoming the 2024 Men’s Over 60 Cricket World Cup.

28/02/2024

England beat Sri Lanka in the 60+ World Cup Semi Finals and play Australia in the Final on Friday 1st March.

Semi Final scorcard Via This Link 

England v Sri Lanka – Semi Final – Wednesday 28th February 2024

Tagore Medical College Cricket Ground - Chennai

Match report by Rash Mahmood

England arrived at the Tagore Medical College Cricket Ground, full of confidence after going through the group stage of the tournament undefeated. Victory today, against a very talented Sri Lanka, would book their place in the final on Friday, to face the winner of the Australia v New Zealand game in the other semi-final.

England had not played at this ground before, and first impressions were that the pitch looked very, very good, with a large outfield, where runs could be accumulated, and big scores made.

Sri Lanka won the toss and elected to bat, with the very dangerous left-handed Johann Pieris, who had made an unbeaten century in his previous game, opening the batting with Thilan Wijesinghe.

England would not be phased by having to bowl first, as they had not allowed a side to score 200 runs or more in the tournament when doing so.

Mike Palmer opened the bowling for England from the Temple End, with Jason Caunt opening from the College End, and after their respective opening overs which yielded 6 runs, Pieris then hit both opening bowlers for consecutive boundaries in their next over, to take them to 27/0 after 4 overs, prompting the England skipper, Richard Merriman to make a change at the Temple end, replacing Palmer with Phil Deakin.

Pieris continued playing some wonderful shots, and Sri Lanka had reached 41/0 at the beginning of the seventh over, their run rate at almost six an over. England needed a breakthrough, and it was Caunt who managed to get the wicket of Wijesinghe, getting him to play at a widish delivery outside the off stump, which he got a thickish outside edge to, and Nick Newman, fielding at point, took a nice catch above his head, Sri Lanka 43/1 with Wijesinghe going for 10.

In Caunt’s next over, Pieris holed out to wide long-on, where Ed Gordon Lennox took a well-judged catch, leaving Sri Lanka on 48/2, and the dangerous Pieris out for 28. England wrestling back the initiative after a blistering Sri Lankan start.

The Sri Lankan skipper Gary Gunnasekara made his way to the middle, but England, having got the two quick wickets, looked a different side, and started to squeeze the Sri Lankan batting effort. Some good fielding and accurate bowling had only allowed Sri Lanka to add 16 runs in the next seven overs, forcing Darsha Abeywardena, to play an aggressive shot off the bowling of Deakin, only for Jim Phillips to take a well-judged low catch at mid-off, reducing Sri Lanka to 66/3, Abeywardena out for 15.

After 20 overs, Sri Lanka had reached 75/3, the brakes really having been put on by England, as the current run rate for Sri Lanka was 3.75, far removed from the start of the innings when they were running at six runs per over.

Jim Phillips replaced Deakin at the Temple End, and struck with his third delivery, getting Ritchie De Silva to edge to Steve Aston behind the stumps, to give him another victim. De Silva out for four, and Sri Lanka now 75/4.

Keith Jansz made his way to the middle to join his skipper Gunnasekera, with the task of trying to rebuild the Sri Lankan innings, which had started off so promisingly, and both batsmen looked to score whenever they could, Jansz in particular playing some well-timed drives, and the pair got Sri Lanka past the 100 mark in the 31st over, only for the skipper Gunnasekara to be caught by an absolutely wonderful catch by Merriman at mid-off, running backwards and stretching out his right hand to gather the ball, a sensational catch, leaving Sri Lanka 107/5, the Sri Lanka captain departing for 17.

Phillips struck again with the first ball of his next over, bowling a beauty to the left-handed Lal Ranasinghe, which pitched on middle and leg and hit the top of off stump, Sri Lanka now 116/6, Ranasinghe out for seven.

Lasantha Perera joined Jansz in the middle, and to their credit, they did look to play aggressively, knowing that a score approaching 200 would give them something to defend. Jansz had moved onto 35 when Nick Newman trapped him LBW in the 38th over, Sri Lanka reduced to 146/7.

When Shaw bowled Kusal Eriyagama for six at the start of the 41st over, leaving Sri Lanka on 156/8, England would have been confident of getting the Sri Lankan innings finished before the 45 over mark, however, some fight from the Sri Lankan batters made England work a bit harder than they thought. Shaw had Perera out caught at point by Caunt for 16 in the middle of the 43rd over, and to the credit of the Sri Lankan batsmen, they did make it to the final over, only to lose their final wicket, as Dissanayake shimmied down the pitch to a Newman delivery, and took an almighty swipe at the ball, missing it and giving Aston behind the stumps the easiest of stumping chances which he took.

Sri Lanka finished on 169 all out, leaving England a target of 170 runs to win in 45 overs, with a required run rate of 3.77 runs per over.

England would have been pleased at the halfway point to have kept another side batting first against them to under 200 runs. However, as has been the case throughout the tournament, there seems a reluctance to really put the hammer down when England have sides struggling. The Sri Lankan innings could and should really have been completed well before the final over.

That being said, England would have been confident that with their batting line up, a target of 170 would and should not pose too much of a problem.

England opened their innings with the skipper Merriman and Nick Gaywood and the pair played confidently, content to take the odd single, not really taking any risks. The score had reached 25, when Merriman was out LBW trying to sweep Duminda De Silva to mid-wicket, missing the ball and being trapped bang in front of the stumps top give umpire Aravindh a very easy decision. The skipper dismissed for eight, England 25/1.

Montie Douglas, who has been in tremendous form in this tournament with 3 centuries back-to-back, made his way out to join Gaywood, and started where he left off against South Africa, a couple of days ago, playing two powerful drives down the ground to get his innings off and running. Gaywood, an elegant stroke maker and run accumulator was content to play a more supporting role, defending for large parts, and letting Douglas do what he does best, however, the England pair seemed to be caught between two stools, as to whether to attack or meander along with little or no risk, running the risk if doing so on putting pressure on the incoming batsmen.

After 15 overs, England had reached 44/1, and in the context of the run chase, that wasn’t too bad, but there remained amongst the England supporters the thought that this cautious approach to reaching the Sri Lankan total may backfire, as Ranasinghe in particular was bowling beautifully, and had been unlucky to not already take a wicket.

After taking on some water, the England innings resumed, and immediately there seemed to be much more impetus to the stroke play and scoring. Douglas played some vicious shots, his score moving rapidly up, and England had made good progress from over 15 to over 20, amassing 33 runs, to be at 77/1 and seemingly on target for a relatively straight forward victory.

Things took a turn in the middle of the 23rd over, when Douglas mistimed a pull shot, and got a thick edge that was caught by Ranasinghe off the bowling of Angelo Dissanayake for 40 off 41 balls, England 85/2.

Mel Hussain joined Gaywood in the middle, and the pair rotated the strike nicely, moving England on and past the century mark in the 26th over. Gaywood began to play a more expansive game, with the century mark passed, played 2 wonderful pull shots over square leg, to move onto 37. However, in the middle of the 30th over, Gaywood played a shot towards the mid-wicket region, only for the Sri Lankan skipper, Gunnasekara to run round from his wide mid-on position and take a smart catch. Gaywood out for 38 to leave England on 113/3.

Aston made his way to the crease and after playing a lovely drive through the cover area, was out, bowled by the excellent Ranasinghe for six, in the 33rd over, leaving England on 125/4, with another 45 runs required.

The Sri Lankans knew that another wicket would have them right back in the game, and you could see the extra bounce in the fielder’s steps.

Graham Shaw came to the crease, and over on the sidelines the tension was clearly visible on the England supporters faces and amongst the watching squad. But big moments call for a clarity of thought and execution, and Shaw and Hussain made sure that England got over the line without further loss of wickets. Shaw played some magnificent shots down the ground, and it was left to Hussain to hit the winning runs, England reaching their target of 170, for the loss of four wickets after 38.5 overs.

Hussain finished on 35 not out off 41 balls, and Shaw 23 not out off 20 balls. So, England’s objective, which was to win the World Cup Final is still very much alive. Truth be told, it felt like England made hard work of getting over the line, but they did, and a final against Australia awaits them on Friday.

The Australians will know all about England and vice versa, and if England are to achieve their desired objective, they will know that they must be decisive and ruthless when the time arrives to press home any advantage they have in the final, over a very talented and experienced Australian team.

Graham Shaw was named Player of the match, & Jim Phillips was voted as England Fighter of the Match. Congratulations to both players.

The stars of the show for England were -:
Batters

R

B

4s

6s

Montie Douglas

40

41

7

 

Nick Gayward 38 99 4  
Mel Hussain 35 41 5  

Graham Shaw

23

40

4

0


Bowlers

O

M

R

W

Kevin Watson

6

1

15

2

Jim Phillips 9 1 40 2
Nick Newman 9 2 20 1
Jason Caunt 5 0 13 1

26/02/2024

England beat South Africa by 132 runs

Full scorecard Via This Link 

England v South Africa – Men’s Over 60 Cricket World Cup – Group A

SRI Ramachandra Medical College Cricket Ground - Chennai

Match report by Rash Mahmood

England returned to the scene of their warmup match victory over India, as they faced South Africa in their final Group A fixture. England had already guaranteed top spot in the group, by beating USA in their previous fixture, which also guaranteed them a semi-final spot with a game to spare.

England made a number of changes to the team that played two days ago, but it was still a very strong line up, and the team were determined to win their final match, to go through the group stage undefeated, being the only team that could do so.

South Africa won the toss and elected to field, but this would not have bothered England as they had batted really well on the pitch previously.

England openers Ed Gordon Lennox and Tony Birbeck opened the innings for England, on a pitch which had been recently watered and had a few cracks in it, which would provide assistance to the South African bowlers, and this was exactly what happened, with Ismael Taladia bowling particularly well from the Hostel end, getting the ball to swing a touch and move off the seam. The England pair were watchful in the first couple of overs, with Birbeck hitting a couple of boundaries.

South Africa made the breakthrough in the 3rd over, and it was Taladia who got Gordon Lennox out caught by Peter Amm at short third man, Gordon Lennox just trying to guide the ball in that region, giving the fielder a very simple catch. England 15/1, which brought Graham Shaw to the crease.

The England tempo increased, with both batters playing some magnificently timed shots, particularly Shaw, and in no time, England had got to 42/1 in the seventh over, when Birbeck on 17, mistimed a cover drive from Mark Tessendorf, which Poole had two goes at catching at cover. 42/2 became 42/3 in the next over when Shaw got one that kept low from Teladia to clatter into his stumps. South Africa were clearly in the ascendancy and were looking to get into the middle and lower order of the England batting.

Montie Douglas came in at the fall of Birbeck’s wicket with Chris Dearden joining him after the dismissal of Shaw, with the task of rebuilding the England innings. This they did very well, with Dearden in a supporting role, Douglas just continued where he had left off against Canada, striking the ball very hard, and dispatching the South Africa bowlers to all parts of the SRI Ramachandra Ground.

Douglas brought up the England century on the first ball of the 19th over, smashing the ball to the mid-wicket boundary, and he and Dearden continued to play their shots, until Dearden, after a partnership of 82, was out caught behind off the bowling of Trevor Poole for 24, in the 23rd over, leaving England at 129/4. It had been a very good innings by Dearden, supporting Douglas who had moved onto 46, and gave England a good chance of posting a score approaching 250 should the remaining England batters play in the same way.

John Butterworth made his way to the middle, and Douglas reached his half century in the next over, having faced 50 deliveries. It was another very composed and assured innings by Douglas, who seemed intent to not give his wicket away at any cost.

England reached 148-5 in the middle of the 27th over, when Poole, who had bowled well for South Africa from the Pavilion End, had Butterworth out LBW for six.

Nick Newman then made his way to the middle, and what happened next is something that will live long in the memory of all who witnessed it. Newman had played quite circumspectly during the tournament, looking to rotate the strike, looking to take the ones and twos that were on offer. Today, however, that style of batting seemed to be thrown out of the window, with Newman showing his intent by depositing the third ball he faced over the deep mid-wicket boundary for six off the bowling of Aqeel Cupido.

If the South Africans harboured any thoughts of keeping England below 200 or even 250 at a push, these hopes were about to be destroyed in an hour and seven minutes of sublime stroke making, exquisite shots, ferocious hitting, and a ruthlessness that had the South Africans running to all parts of the ground and into the brushland over the boundary ropes to retrieve the ball.

Newman reached his 50 in the 37th over, with a brutal shot over mid-off for four, his 50 coming off 34 balls. Douglas, no shrinking violet himself had continued to play his shots and had reached 74 off 78 balls, leaving England on 218/5, and with serious hopes of going well past 250 and towards 300.

The South African fielders were visibly rocked by the onslaught they were facing, and the carnage that was unfolding in front of them, did not stop there.

At the start of the 41st over Newman had reached 60 off 46 balls and Douglas was on 94 off 89 balls. A taster of what was to come, was given by Newman, who deposited Tessendorf over mid-wicket for six.

Poor Irshadul Haq, came onto bowl from the Hostel End, and after Douglas had pushed a single to long on, Newman then went, 4, 4, 6, 6, 6 to leave him on 94 after 54 balls!!! It was a remarkable sequence of hitting, with the ball disappearing from some beautifully crafted cricket shots, these were not slogs, by any means, they were controlled, cultured and the crowd were absolutely loving it, not so the South African fielders who looked as though they just wanted to get off the field.

England were 286/5 at the start of the 43rd over, and Douglas duly reached a magnificent century, his third consecutive one with a wonderfully executed extra cover drive to bring him to three figures off 95 balls.

There was a distinct and audible buzz around the ground as Barney De Clerk came into start the 44th over, with Newman on strike, and Newman, ever the showman did not disappoint the crowd, reaching a truly magnificent century of 59 balls with a towering six over deep mid-wicket, and it was fitting that Newman struck the last ball of the England innings for four, to leave the score at 306/5.

What took place on that field from the middle of the 27th over was utter carnage. Douglas and Newman put on a partnership of 158 runs, in just 17.7 overs with a run rate of 8.92 runs per over.

Douglas reached his third consecutive century, his second consecutive not out, and his batting average currently sits at a quite frankly ridiculous 328 !!!

Newman, well there are not many words I can use that adequately describe his innings, it was simply one of the finest innings I have ever seen, and he should be immensely proud of what he achieved at the SRI Ramachandra Ground, it is an innings that will live long in the memory.

Newman finished on 107 not out, and Douglas 104 not out, and Newman after passing his 50 after 34 balls, then scored a further 54 runs off just 28 balls.

Lunch was taken with everyone in the ground still talking about what they had seen transpire out on the pitch. England knew that the total posted would be a very difficult one for the South Africans to chase, with the required run rate at the start of their innings standing at 6.82 runs per over.

England knew a fast start was essential, to further demoralise the South Africans, and it duly came in just the second over with Kevin Watson, fresh from taking a wicket with his first ball in the previous match, waiting until his second delivery this time around, to have Brad Bing mis time a drive, and John Butterworth took a very comfortable catch at short cover, South Africa 5/1 and already in trouble.

Aqeel Cupido for South Africa, looked in good nick, playing some very controlled and well-timed shots. South Africa had progressed to 23/1 in the 6th over when the excellent Mike Palmer, had Tessendorf trapped LBW for 4, to leave South Africa in big trouble at 23/2.

Stuart Hendricks joined Cupido, and Palmer had him trapped LBW for five in the eighth over, to leave South Africa at 33/3.

Trevor Poole came to the wicket, and he and Cupido played some good, disciplined cricket, taking the score to 77, when Cupido on 46, hit one straight back to the bowler Jim Phillips, who took a smart return catch to leave South Africa on 77/4. Cupido had played very nicely indeed.

Amm came out but didn’t stay long, caught behind by Simon Routh for off the bowling of Phil Deakin, to leave South Africa at 80/5, which became 82/6 when the skipper Richard Merriman took a well-judged catch at mid-off from Poole off the bowling of Newman for 18.

Dearden, so often a vital wicket taker for England, again did not disappoint, with the wickets of Birkenstock and Amien for 13 and 1 respectively, to all but condemn South Africa to defeat.

Some excellent batting by De Klerk and Taladia, got the South Africa score to a somewhat respectable 174 in the 38th over, but when De Klerk was brilliantly stumped by the returning Routh behind the stumps off the bowling of Palmer for a well batted 46, Taladia followed a few deliveries after for 27, caught at slip by Deakin off the bowling of Shaw for 27, South Africa were all out in 39.2 over for 174.

England, victorious by 132 runs

England have really played some magnificent cricket through the group games, and the last three will have really pleased the England Management Team. The batting has strength in depth, the bowling unit is talented, and individuals can operate for long spells, something that is a bonus in the hot and humid conditions., and the fielding, for the most part has been excellent.

Newman was quite rightly named Player of The Match for his magnificent century.

As the results started to filter through from Group B, it became clear that on Wednesday morning, England will face a very talented Sri Lanka side in the semi- final at the Tagore Ground, whilst Australia will take on New Zealand in the other semi-final.

Hopes are high in the England camp ahead of the fixture on Wednesday, and it will take a very good, talented and disciplined team to stop the England juggernaut.

The stars of the game against South Africa were:

Batters

R

B

4s

6s

Nick Newman

107 no

62

12

6

Montie Douglas

104 no

97

15

0


Bowlers

O

M

R

W

Michael Palmer

7

2

27

3

Chris Dearden 3 0 14 2

 

 

 

22/02/2024

England beat USA by 9 wickets

Full scorecard Via This Link 

England v USA – Men’s Over 60 Cricket World Cup – Group A

VB Nest Cricket Academy, Chennai – Saturday 24thth February 2024

Match report by Rash Mahmood

England arrived at the VB Nest Cricket Academy ground, knowing a win over the USA in their fourth match in Group A would guarantee top spot in the group, with one game to spare and book their place in the semi-finals. England went into this game as the only remaining undefeated team in the tournament.

The USA won the toss and elected to bat, meaning England for the second successive match would be bowling first, on what looked a good wicket. The USA team knew that a win against England would strengthen their grip on finishing in the top two in the table.

The England team, buoyed by their performance against Zimbabwe in the previous match, looked to get amongst the USA batters early on. England would not disappoint, and in truth this was as one sided a game as you are likely to see in a long time. Ajith Jayasinghe & Ahmed Merchant opened the batting for the USA.

Jason Caunt, who has bowled magnificently well opening the bowling for England throughout the tournament, took the new ball from the pavilion end, and bowled a typical over, on the stumps, getting the batsmen to play. Kevin Watson, who by his own admission had been struggling to find his rhythm opened the bowling from the far end. Watson is too good a player to be struggling for long and took the wicket of Merchant with his first ball, pitching on middle and nipping back in off the seam to hit leg stump. A tremendous start by Watson, and you could see by the celebrations of the England team, how pleased they were for him. The USA were 2/1, as C.K Barlingay made his way out to the middle.

The opening bowling duo of Caunt & Watson were giving nothing away, and Caunt struck in the fourth over, getting one to straighten, as C.K Barlingay looked to play a ball down the leg side, the ball brushing off his pad and hitting leg stump. The USA two down with only 10 runs on the board.

Jeevaka Weerasinghe joined Ajith Jayasinghe in the middle, with the hope of settling the innings down and allowing the USA to accumulate runs, however, Caunt and Watson had other ideas. Both bowlers continued to bowl excellent lines and lengths, and bar the odd edge, bringing the USA some valuable runs, the USA batters were really struggling to garner any momentum to their innings. Watson struck again in the ninth over, with Jayasinghe trying to give himself some room to guide the ball towards the third man area, exposed his stumps, and Watson bowling full and straight, clean bowled him for 11, reducing the USA to 25/3.

At 25/3 after 10 overs, the England skipper made a double change, replacing Caunt at the pavilion end with Jim Phillips and Nick Newman replacing Watson at the far end. Both opening bowlers will have been delighted with their five over spells, and Richard Merriman who has almost exclusively asked his bowlers to bowl in tandem for spells, looked to two of his spinners to put the squeeze on the USA, and squeeze they did.

Wayne Copeland had come out to bat for the USA after the fall of their third wicket, but like his colleagues, found it difficult to get any momentum to his innings, wholly down to the tremendous bowling of Phillips and Newman, who did exactly what the skipper would have wanted, and bowled accurately and skilfully, varying their pace, flight and length, to leave the USA batters visibly frustrated.

Eight overs had gone since the third wicket fell, and only 18 runs had been conceded by England in that period, when Phillips had Copeland out stumped for nine, some more great work by the England wicket keeper Steve Aston, to leave the USA in real trouble at 44/4.

Phillips and Newman continued to bowl intelligently, and Phillips got another wicket at the end of the 20th over, having Weerasinghe LBW for 20, the USA score now stood at 56/5. Dave Ramdan joined his partner Pri De Silva, but the momentum of the USA innings didn’t really change, and Newman got just reward for an excellent spell when in the 23rd over he had De Silva in two minds to a delivery outside the off stump. As De Silva decided not to play a shot, the ball hit his retreating bat, and bounced down and cannoned into the stumps. An unfortunate way for De Silva to be dismissed for 10, to leave the USA at 69/6.

Ramdan scored a couple of boundaries, to bring some welcome runs to the USA, but the England bowling duo of Phillips and Newman put on a masterclass of spin bowling. At the end of the 28th over, both bowlers had bowled their allotted nine overs straight through, in hot and humid conditions, with skill, and guile, and it was a magnificent display of bowling by both players. Only 61 runs had been added during their spell, for the loss of three USA wickets, a fantastic return.

Chris Dearden replaced Phillips at the pavilion end, and I’m not sure the USA batters would have faced too many bowlers of Dearden’s calibre. Having spoken to Dearden the other day, he informed me that he once took offence at being called a ‘Dibbly-Dobbly’ bowler. In describing his bowling style, I will go with slow and flighted which I think best describes it.

With Dearden replacing Phillips at the pavilion end, Marcus Young, the leading wicket taker in the tournament came on from the far end to replace Newman, and Young got straight into the action, having Ramdan stumped by Aston, Ramdan having had no clue whatsoever with Young’s first ball which turned a mile, advanced down the pitch, presumably to get off strike, and Aston made no mistake gathering cleanly and removing the bails. Ramdan batted well for the USA for 21, but his departure had them on 89/7.

89/7 became 94/8 a few balls later when Mark Wright was run out for two, running to the strikers end, after his batting partner Anup Desai had pushed the ball into the covers for what looked like an easy single. However, Ed Gordon Lennox, the England Vice Captain, is one of the best fielders in the England team, and he sprinted round to his left, picked up the ball cleanly and threw to the batter’s end, where Aston gathered cleanly, with Wright well our of his ground. A tremendous bit of fielding typified the England effort out there.

Could the USA, get to three figures? Well, they did manage to do so, getting there in the 32nd over, but having done so, lost another wicket, Dearden having Desai stumped for 5, giving Aston another victim, and putting the USA on 100/9.

Some agricultural hitting by the last wicket pair from the USA, Chandraseker Tirumurti and Rizwan Sheikh gave the USA supporters something to cheer about, but the innings ended in the 39th over with Sheikh being run out looking for a second run, but a good chase and throw from Newman, meant an easy task for Aston to remove the bails, with the USA posting 122 all out, with still 5.5 overs of the allotted innings remaining.

England bowled and fielded magnificently in high heat and humidity. They never really gave the USA batters a chance to express themselves and score runs quickly, and in the end, all six bowlers who bowled picked up wickets, and the England skipper, Merriman would have been delighted with his team’s effort, commitment and performance.

After the lunch break, the England openers, Richard Merriman and the returning Nick Gaywood made their way out to the middle, requiring 123 runs to win at a run rate of 2.73, which really should have posed no problem for the talented batting line up England have.

And so, it proved, with Merriman and Gaywood looking untroubled out in the middle and after six overs England had reached 32/0, with the skipper in particular playing some expansive shots. Gaywood, returning to the team after injury, was batting well within himself, but he is a very elegant player to watch and he started to play some beautifully timed shots, all around the ground.

The England duo looked in no danger whatsoever, and the question was, how would they look to get across the line, plating expansive cricket or taking it slower and in a more considered fashion. In truth, it was a bit of both, but in the 15th over, the skipper tried to sweep to deep mid-wicket and was hit on the pads, bang in front for 24 off the bowling of Merchant, leaving England on 49/1. Merriman’s wicket brought Mel Hussain out to the crease. Hussain batted well against Zimbabwe in the previous match, looking a lot more composed and decisive in his batting.

Hussain was busy at the crease, rotating the strike at every opportunity, and with Gaywood clearly set, and looking to play some more expansive shots, the England pair put on runs at a good rate, with Gaywood in particular playing some majestic shots, none more so than in the 21st over, when he played a beautiful drive over long off, with the minimum amount of effort, to get the shot of the day, only to surpass that shot, with a six to the same region, which sailed over the boundary rope, bring cheers and clapping from the England spectators and players, it really was a wonderfully timed cricket shot.

From here, it was to all intents and purposes a stroll for the England pair. The USA to their credit kept at it, but the result was never really in doubt.  Gaywood reached his 50 in the 26th over off 69 balls, and in the 28th over, he drew the scores level with another boundary through the mid wicker region.

It was left to Mel Hussain to score the winning run in the next over, to give England a comfortable nine wicket victory, with 16.5 overs to spare, Gaywood 55 not out and Hussain 34 not out.

This was a dominant display by England, who having beaten Zimbabwe by eight wickets and almost 14 overs to spare in the in previous match, went a good deal better in this one.

It was a victory that owed much to a number of factors, not least the fact that England have a far superior team than the USA. The England Management Team will be delighted that having made a number of changes to the team from the Zimbabwe game, the changes made appear seamless, with everyone who comes into the side, contributing.

England’s bowling and fielding was very, very good, and if they can maintain these high standards going forward, then it is going to take a very good team to beat them. They remain undefeated in the tournament and will look to progress through the group stage unbeaten, when they take on South Africa on Monday. We can expect a raft of changes to be made to rest players, but England will look to win the game and win well.

A special mention for the England wicket-keeper, Aston, who has been nothing short of sensational during this tournament, amassing 12 victims, including 10 stumpings (although he believes there should be another one officially listed), and two catches behind. When a keeper is in that kind of form, and the fielders are fielding the way they are, then England, with their batting line up become a very formidable side.

Man of the match award went to Kevin Watson, and rightly so, but the whole England bowling performance was excellent.

The stars of the show for England were -:

Batters

R

B

4s

6s

Nick Gayward

55 no

72

6

1

Mel Hussain

34 no

42

3

0


Bowlers

O

M

R

W

Kevin Watson

6

1

15

2

Jim Phillips 9 1 40 2
Nick Newman 9 2 20 1
Jason Caunt 5 0 13 1

 

 

 

 

22/02/2024

England beat Zimbabwe by 8 wickets

Full scorecard Via This Link 

England v Zimbabwe – Group A – Thursday 22nd February 2024 Amir Mahal Cricket Ground - Chennai

Match report by Rash Mahmood

England played their third group game in four days against Zimbabwe at the Amir Mahal Cricket Ground in Chennai, and arguably put in their most complete performance of the tournament, winning by eight wickets with 14.5 overs to spare.

Zimbabwe won the toss and elected to bat, meaning England would have to bowl first, something they had not done in the tournament so far.

The pitch, as with all the pitches in the tournament, looked well prepared.

England opened the bowling with Mike Palmer from the pavilion end and were determined to make early inroads into the Zimbabwe batting, but openers Eddo Brandes and John Jameson, set their stall out early. The imposing figure of Brandes playing two wonderful, lofted shots over mid-on for boundaries in the first over.

Jason Caunt opened from the Flat Complex End, and was right on point from his first delivery, bowling a maiden over.

Palmer having been hit for boundaries in his first over replied in good fashion, and with Caunt bowling accurately at the other end, Zimbabwe after their early flurry were going along in singles, although Brandes was still trying to bat aggressively.

At 20/1 at the end of the fifth over, Caunt bowled to Brandes, who again tried to show his intent by coming down the pitch. Caunt, seeing him come down the wicket, very cleverly bowled a shorter length, which Brandes missed, leaving the ever-reliable Steve Aston the simple task of removing the bails, leaving Zimbabwe 20/1.

Caunt struck again, with a similar delivery to Wayne Jones in the seventh over, resulting in another stumping by Aston to leave Zimbabwe on 32/2. England were in the ascendancy and sensed that another wicket would leave Zimbabwe with a mountain to climb.

32/2 became 32/3 in the very next over, when Palmer got his reward for some excellent bowling, by inducing an edge from Jameson, which was gobbled up by Aston.

Phil Deakin replaced Palmer at the pavilion end, and was amongst the wickets straight away, bowling Wayne Parham for 0, leaving Zimbabwe in all sorts of trouble at 32/4.

Kenyon Ziehl made his way out to the middle to join Rory McWade, and the pair set about trying to rebuild the Zimbabwe innings, and credit where credit is due, the pair played very sensibly, taking what was offered to them to progress the score to 75, when John Butterworth, operating from the flats complex end, got a ball to nip back and trap Ziehl in front, giving umpire Aadhithya Muralitharan an easy decision to make.

Gary Steyn joined McWade at the crease, and both batters, sensing the need to stay at the crease, batted very well and progressed the score, albeit not at an alarming rate, with McWade reaching his half century in the 28th over off 72 balls.

Drinks were taken at the 30 over point, with Zimbabwe on 120/5.

After drinks, Marcus Young, operating from the pavilion end, and who had no luck whatsoever from his bowling, got one to turn sharply, and McWade got an edge that Deakin took at slip, to leave Zimbabwe on 121/6, with McWade departing for 53 off 83 balls. It was a very fine knock by McWade in very difficult circumstances.

Young, having seen the turn he got on the delivery that got McWade out, was now turning the ball at will, bamboozling the Zimbabwe batters and he struck again in his next over, getting Jono Lane to chase a wider delivery which spun sharply, and before Lane could get back into his ground, the excellent Aston removed the bails to leave Zimbabwe on 132/7.

Young completed his 9 over spell from the pavilion end, with his figures reading nine overs, one maiden, one wicket, for 25 runs.

Chris Dearden replaced him at the pavilion end and got Steyn to nick one to Aston behind the stumps, who made no mistake taking another catch, to leave Zimbabwe on 151/8.

When Deakin got Shaun Lawler trapped plumb in front in the 39th over, Zimbabwe had reached 166/9, and were in danger of being bowled out before their allotted 45 overs, however, some good batting and running between the wickets by Gregor McDonald & Pete Sandys Thomas, got Zimbabwe through to the end of their overs, posting a score of 197/9.

This was a very good total by Zimbabwe, considering they were at one stage at 32/4.

England, well they would have been happy to keep Zimbabwe to under 200 runs but may feel that they had the opportunity to be a bit more aggressive when they had the opposition on the ropes, to potentially leave them with a much lower total to chase.

In any event, the required run rate for England at the commencement of their innings stood at 4.44 runs per over, well within their reach with the batting line up England had.

The England skipper Richard Merriman and Tony Birbeck opened the innings for England, and it was the skipper, carrying on his excellent scoring form, who got England off to the perfect start, from ball one, cutting powerfully to backward point for four off the bowling of Naik, and followed that up with an even classier stroke through the offside for four more.

Merriman continued to show a complete disregard for the Zimbabwe attack and another two boundaries came in the next over to leave England on 24/0 after two overs.

Zimbabwe were clearly rattled and needed a breakthrough and quickly, and they got that in the very next over, when Birbeck played back to a shorter delivery, and scooped the ball to Lawler at short mid-wicket, who took a simple catch meaning Birbeck was out without troubling the scorers.

The wicket of Birbeck brought Montie Douglas to the crease, fresh of his magnificent century against Canada in the previous match. He made his way out to the middle to join the skipper Merriman, with whom he had shared a 164 run partnership last time out.

Douglas wasted no time getting back into the scoring groove, playing shots all around the ground, hitting the ball powerfully. Merriman, who had played a supporting role to Douglas last time out against Canada, also chose to go on the offensive, and Zimbabwe had no answer to the two England batters’ aggressive batting.

Douglas reached his 50 in the 15th over, off 39 balls. Merriman also reached his 50 in the 20th over, getting there of 65 balls, and the skipper looked all set for another big score, with the partnership between him and Douglas standing at 104, when he was brilliantly caught at mid-off by Lawler, to leave England on 128/2.

Mel Hussain joined Douglas, who was on 60, and the pair played some magnificent cricket, not giving Zimbabwe a chance. Hussain, playing well within himself, but looking assured and confident, was happy to give the strike to Douglas. The pair ran well between the wickets, and played some wonderful strokes, particularly Douglas, who was motoring along, and he duly reached his second consecutive century in the 29th over, reaching that milestone of 83 balls.

The first ball of the 30th over was beautifully dispatched to the boundary by Hussain, to give England a comprehensive margin of victory, reaching 199/2 with 14.5 overs remaining. This was another dominant batting performance by England. Merriman and Douglas shared another century partnership, and Douglas completed a chanceless century.

The England performance overall was of good quality, with all three phases executed very well. The only issue, as mentioned earlier, was whether England could have been more ruthless when Zimbabwe were struggling at 32/4. That said, it was another victory for the team, and will have given the team confidence, knowing that they could operate at such an intense and commanding level, batting second.

England will be looking forward to the next match against the USA, which has been rescheduled, and now is due to take place on Saturday 23rd February with a 4:00am UK time start. England will know that a victory will secure top spot in the group, securing their place in the semi-finals, and although the USA will be tough opponents, England will be confident of securing top spot in Group A with a game to spare.

Man of the match for his fine century was Montie Douglas.  

The stars of the show for England were -:

Batters

R

B

4s

6s

Montie Douglas

106

86

18

0

Richard Merriman

50

66

6

0


Bowlers

O

M

R

W

Marcus Young

9

1

25

2

Jason Caunt 7 3 22 2
Phil Deakin 9 0 51 2

 

 

 

20/02/2024

England beat Canada by 59 Runs.

Full scorecard Via This Link 

Match report England v Canada – Men’s Over 60 Cricket World Cup – Group A

PEBL City Cricket Ground, Chennai – Tuesday 20th February 2024 Report by Rash Mahmood

England continued their Group A World Cup campaign with a hard-fought victory by 60 runs against a very spirited and much improved Canada team. The previous meeting between the two teams took place in August last year, when the sides met in Canada, playing in the Canada Cup. England on that occasion, bowled Canada out for 78, reaching their target for the loss of one wicket. Things would turn out to go much differently this time around.

Both teams came into the game having won their opening games, Canada beating the USA by one wicket, and England beating New Zealand by 116 runs. Playing back-to-back games was always going to be tough, and both teams made several changes from the teams that played the day before.
Canada won the toss and put England in, on what looked a good wicket. The conditions at start of play were sunny, with little or no breeze, with the temperature approaching 30 degrees with humidity over 65%, and the temperature set to rise into the mid 30 degrees.

Richard Merriman & Tony Birbeck opened the innings for England, and the pair made a steady start, with both Merriman & Birbeck playing some lovely shots through the offside, although the Canadian opening bowlers of Terrance Holder & Stanley Paul got a little movement in the air and tried to bowl a full length. It was in the third over that Canada made a breakthrough. Birbeck hit back-to-back boundaries, before Holder trapped him LBW for 13, bringing Montie Douglas to the wicket.

Little did the England players or spectators at the ground know what was about to transpire. Douglas wasted no time playing his shots, dealing almost exclusively in boundaries, pummelling the Canadian bowlers to all parts of the PEBL City Stadium. Merriman, a quick scorer himself seemed content to give his partner as much of the strike as possible, and Douglas carried on his merry way, reaching his 50 off 44 balls in the 16th over, as England reached 98-1, with a run rate just above six runs per over.

Douglas continued to smash the ball to the boundary at every opportunity, and the pair scored freely, with the skipper Merriman reaching his 50 in the 25th over with a beautiful sweep shot to the mid-wicket boundary, his 50 coming off 61 balls. The score at this point was 156-1, and a score of over 300 was on the cards.

However, in the 27th over, Sanjiv Choksi gave the Canadians some welcome relief, getting Merriman out LBW, breaking the Douglas/Merriman partnership that had yielded 164 and two balls later clean bowling Ed Gordon Lennox for a duck, leaving England on 194-3.

John Butterworth then joined Douglas at the crease, and the runs continued, with Douglas reaching his century in the 34th over, off 99 balls. His innings came to and end in the 36th over when he was stumped coming down the pitch, to give Choksi another wicket. Douglas slowly made his way off the field to a standing ovation from all present, and he looked physically drained, but can be very proud of playing such a wonderfully entertaining innings.

One wicket brings two so the saying goes, and Butterworth departed in the next over, holing out to long on for 19. Nick Newman joined Jim Phillips out in the middle, and both players looked to score quickly. Newman was caught behind for 19 in the 41st over, bringing the big hitting Graham Shaw to the crease, and together with Phillips, who was out for 28 in the final over, England posted a very impressive total of 319-7.

The Canadian innings began with a required run rate of 7.1, with the skipper Garvin Budhoo & Raj Sankar opening the innings. England opened with the bowling attack of Jason Caunt & Kevin Watson, and Canada made a bright start to their innings, with Budhoo in particular taking a leaf out of the Douglas play book, by dealing almost exclusively in boundaries, and Canada although not meeting the required run rate, were going along at over five an over, when Watson had Sankar trapped LBW in the fifth over, leaving Canada at 33-1.

Ranjit Chaudhri joined his skipper out in the middle and was clearly intent on playing the supporting role for his side, and let his skipper continue on his merry way, which is what happened. Budhoo continued to play some brutal shots and England, now fielding in the afternoon heat seemed to lose their way a little, with some lax fielding and indifferent bowling, something that had not been seen thus far in the previous three games played in India.

Fatigue, tiredness, and concentration lapses are to be expected when players are playing back-to-back games in this heat and with this humidity, but Canada sensed that the momentum was clearly with them. At the halfway stage, Canada had reached 131-1 with Budhoo on 80 and Chaudhri on 33, leaving themselves requiring a further 189 runs to win at a rate of 8.4 runs per over.

In the 25th over, the skipper called the hero of yesterday into action, Marcus Young, and together with Phillips bowling from the other end, England slowly began to wrestle back the initiative from Canada, although the dangerous Budhoo was still at the crease, he was clearly struggling, and England got the breakthrough they needed in the 27th over, with Young bowling Choudhri for 40.

Budhoo reached his century in the next over off 88 balls faced, and it wasn’t until the 30th over that the innings really swung into England’s favour, and it was that man Young again at the heart of it, producing an unbelievable bit of fielding, taking a one-handed catch off his own bowling to dismiss Choksi.

It was fielding of the highest order, as he was initially going the other way in his follow through before stopping and sticking out his right hand to take a simply stunning catch. Canada were now on 177-3 and the run rate was increasing, something that the skipper Budhoo was all too aware of, as he continued trying to smash the ball to all parts of the ground.

If those present thought that the catch by Young was something special, then they were about to witness something equally, if not more spectacular. Young bowled to the powerful figure of Holder, and the left hander connected beautifully with a stray delivery to send the ball flying towards the deep square leg boundary, in the direction of Caunt who appeared to have got sight of the ball coming towards him, but then signalled that he had lost the ball in flight. As all present looked on and from afar, the ball was hurtling towards Caunt, who was still oblivious to the fact that the ball appeared to be on a trajectory to land on his head!!!!

Amazingly, at what seemed to be the last second, Caunt half turned and managed to catch the ball as it passed his waist. It was a catch that defies an accurate description or category, but was caught on camera, so others can judge what to call it.

Canada, now at 192-4 in the 32nd over were now up against it, run rate wise, but with the dangerous Budhoo still at the crease, there was still hope for Canada. This hope was extinguished in the 35th over, when John Butterworth had Budhoo stumped by Steve Aston for an excellent 127 off 111 balls.

Ishwar Nandlall came to the crease and hit some lusty blows, but it was that man again, Young, getting him to hole out to deep mid-wicket where Mel Hussain took a fine running catch to leave Canada on 230/6 in the 38th over, and giving Young his fourth wicket of the innings.

GordonLennox, who missed out with the bat, again demonstrated his excellent fielding skills, by running out Mohammed Rameez in the 41st over, with a direct hit from the cover area to leave Canada at 250/7.
Shaw came on to replace Young and promptly had Wilson Seenath Singh LBW, before Butterworth claimed another wicket, to have Canada finish on 260/9, giving England the victory by 60 runs.

Whilst on paper this looks a comfortable victory for England, it was a lot harder than the scores indicate. England will have been delighted with the batting side of their innings, and in particular, the century by Douglas, but it was the bowling and fielding that England will need to look at when they next play on Thursday against Zimbabwe.

Whether it was fatigue or a lack of mental clarity, there were times in the Canada innings were some of the bowling and decision making by the players could certainly be questioned. Against stronger sides than Canada, who although defeated must take a great deal of heart from such a tremendous run chase, England may well be punished.

However, this is tournament cricket, and there are going to be a lot of ups and downs. At the moment, England sit at the top of Group A, with two wins out of two, and at the end of the day, winning is all that matters.

England’s next opponents on Thursday 22nd February are Zimbabwe, who beat South Africa in their opening game, but lost to New Zealand by seven wickets in their next game.

The stars of the show for England were -:

Batters

R

B

4s

6s

Montie Douglas

114

106

19

2

Richard Merriman

78

72

13

1


Bowlers

O

M

R

W

Marcus Young

9.0

0

49

4

 

 

 

19/02/2024

England beat New Zealand by 116 Runs

Full scorecard Via This Link 

Match report England v New Zealand – Men’s Over 60 Cricket World Cup – Group ‘A’

Waheguru Cricket Ground, Chennai – Monday 19th February 2024
Report by Rash Mahmood & John Butterworth

England opened their World Cup campaign with a crushing 116 run victory over one of the tournaments fancied teams, New Zealand, in the first round of matches in Group A.
An early start, with a coach pick up from the team hotel at 7:00am and a transit to the ground taking about 90 minutes proved no hindrance to a sparkling England team performance.

The pitch looked a good one, and skipper Richard Merriman had no hesitation when winning the toss to bat first. The temperature at the start of the game was in the high 20’s, with it expected to get into the low 30’s during the course of the England innings.

New Zealand, beaten finalists two years ago when beaten by Pakistan, had seven players from that squad in this squad this time around, and from speaking with Steve Cunningham, the Kiwi Team Manager, confidence was high, although Cunningham acknowledged that this game would probably be his side’s sternest test in the group stage.

Richard Merriman and Nick Gaywood opened the batting, with the pair playing within themselves, getting used to the pitch and conditions, and not offering any chances to the Kiwis. However, in the third over, Tony Gray got a ball to stick slightly in the pitch and skipper Merriman on six, seemed to be through his shot early, and scooped the ball to Gibb at cover for an easy catch, leaving England 15-1.

Mel Hussain joined Gaywood at the crease and the pair drove England forward, with Gaywood in particular playing some delightful shots all around the ground.

England were pushing on when Gaywood, who had played beautifully attempted a reverse sweep off the dangerous Andrew Nuttall, missing the ball and being plumb in front of the stumps, giving the umpire a very easy LBW decision. It was a blow for England and especially Gaywood, but it was a very classy innings, with a range of delightfully timed shots, and the England Management Team will be happy Gaywood appeared to have no lingering effects from an Achilles injury he had been suffering with, scoring 47 off 41 balls.

72-2 at the time of Gaywood’s departure brought Steve Aston out to the middle to join Hussain, who was stumped on 28 by Mark McMillan off the bowling of Martin Pennefather to leave England at 98-3, which soon became 100-4 when Ed Gordon Lennox got a full toss from Pennefather and with the whole ground at his mercy, hit it straight back to the bowler.

Graham Shaw was the next man in, and it is here that the England innings really took off. Steve Aston had been playing well within himself, but with Shaw on the attack, savaging anything short or wide, he too joined in, and the ball disappeared to the boundary ropes at frequent intervals. Aston played superbly, dispatching anything wide of the stumps, to the boundary. Not to be outdone, Shaw began bludgeoning the New Zealand bowling to all parts of the ground, and the Kiwis were visibly wilting under not only the batting assault, but also toiling in the field as the temperature rose.

Shaw & Aston put on a magnificent 134 together, when Aston departed, caught off the bowling of Mike Johnston for 73, off 82 balls with 12 fours. Shaw followed shortly after, another stumping victim for McMillen off the bowling of Pennyfather for 71, scored off 48 balls, with seven fours and three sixes, to leave England at 249-6, with six overs to go.

An excellent cameo by the Lancashire duo Phil Deakin & Chris Dearden took England past the 280 mark, with Deakin departing in the final over for 24 to leave England posting a formidable 291-7 off their 45 overs.

It was a very balanced innings by the England batters. New Zealand were sensing restricting England to a score under 200 having them at 100-4, but a strong middle order batting display will have delighted the England Management Team. The New Zealand players looked thoroughly shattered as they left the pitch at the end of the innings.

Although Pennefather took 4-60 runs, special mention must be given to the bowling of Andrew Nuttall, whose figures of 9-1-1-33, doesn’t give him the recognition his bowling deserved, as he beat the outside edge of the bat on numerous occasions, and was very unlucky to end up with just the one wicket. A special mention also must go to Craig Morris, who for the entire game, patrolled the boundary and produced some amazing stops, saving probably 25 to 30 runs.

After a 45-minute break for lunch, New Zealand came out to bat needing 292 runs to win, at a run rate of 6.48 runs per over, and with the outfield lightning fast, they will have fancied their chances with the batting talent in their team.

Craig Gibb & Chris Kennedy opened the batting for New Zealand, with Mike Palmer opening the bowling from the Pavilion End, and England got the perfect start, with Gibb smashing the last ball of the over to cover and setting off for what looked to be a well-timed run, however Gordon Lennox, stationed at cover, had other ideas, and having done brilliantly well in the first place to dive to his left to partially stop the ball, had the presence of mind to scoop the ball up, swivel on one knee and throw the ball to the bowler’s end, hitting the stumps directly with Gibb out of his ground. A dream start for England, but disaster for New Zealand.

This brought the Kiwi skipper Graeme Inglis to the crease, and he along with Kennedy began the task of rebuilding the New Zealand innings. With the score on 22 in the middle of the fifth over, Caunt, who had been bowling well from the Factory End, got Kennedy to mistime a drive, and took a smart return catch.

Phil Deakin replaced Palmer at the pavilion end, and bowled very well, and with Caunt continuing at the Factory End, New Zealand were finding it difficult to get the England bowlers away. Jim Phillips took over from Caunt and in the 13th over England got another wicket, with another fantastic piece of fielding, with the skipper Merriman running out Russell Drake with a direct hit from the cover area, to leave New Zealand at 44-3 and in real trouble, needing another 248 runs to win from 31 overs, with a run rate required of eight runs per over.

Craig Morris joined his skipper out in the middle, and his busy, bustling batting, together with the Kiwi skipper Inglis starting to find his touch, got the New Zealand innings back on track, although the England bowling and particularly the fielding was still of a very high standard, keeping the score down, to leave New Zealand at 100-3 at the halfway stage of the innings. Three wickets soon became four, when Phillips had Morris trapped LBW for 28, to leave New Zealand 103-4.

Greg Alexander made his way to the middle and started to time the ball very well, and with the skipper Inglis reaching his 50 off 70 deliveries, New Zealand began the process of getting their innings back on track. Alexander, sensing some tiredness amongst the England fielders went on the attack, smashing three consecutive boundaries off the bowling of Marcus Young in the 28th over. Young was clearly annoyed at this, but got a delivery to grip, turn and bounce which would have given him some confidence as the drink break approached.

At drinks, at the 30 over mark, New Zealand had reached 134-4, still needing a further 158 runs to win in 15 overs, and although having six wickets in hand, the required run rate had risen to 10.5 runs per over.

Young started the first over after the drinks break, and having seen the ball grip, turn and bounce in his previous over, bowled an absolute gem of a delivery to Alexander, who had come down the pitch, the ball spinning sharply past the outside edge of the bat, into the gloves of wicket-keeper Aston, who swiftly whipped off the bails with Alexander well out of his ground, leaving New Zealand 134-5, and in real trouble. A disastrous start after the drinks break from the Kiwis, but just what England needed to further press home their advantage.

Five became six in the 33rd over, when Young, bowling with great confidence and expertise, had Pennefather stumped, to leave New Zealand on 150-6, and Young continued his devasting spell following the drinks break with the prized wicket of the New Zealand skipper Inglis for 60, who was also stumped, giving Young his third wicket, and Aston his third stumping, to leave New Zealand on 159-7 after 35 overs.

There were further wickets for Deakin and Dearden to inflict further misery on the opponents as they reached the total of 170-9 after 38 overs. The remaining seven overs were played out with very little of note, and at the close of the innings, England had restricted New Zealand to 179-9, giving England a victory by 116 runs.

This was a very good performance by the England team in all three phases of the game, following on from the performances in the warmup games. New Zealand were on paper, the strongest opposition in Group A, but England batted particularly well, putting the New Zealand bowling under pressure and running very well between the wickets. When in the field, the strong ground fielding England had shown in the warmup games came to the fore, but the match really turned after the 30 over drink break, with Young ripping through the New Zealand batting.

England will no doubt be the happier of the two teams and will be pleased to have played so well against strong opposition, which bodes well for the remaining fixtures in the tournament. As for New Zealand, well they are too good a team to stay down for long, and will no doubt come good, but today, they were out played, outsmarted and out thought by a very good England team performance.

The stars of the show for England were -:

Batters

R

B

4s

6s

Steve Aston

73

83

12

0

Graham Shaw

71

47

7

3


Bowlers

O

M

R

W

Marcus Young

9.0

1

47

3

 

Over 60s World Cup 2024 – England Squad

History
This is the second Over 60s World Cup and the first England will be competing in.

England head into this tournament on the back of a very successful 2023 that saw them win the Caribbean Cup, the Grey Ashes and share the Canada Cup with Australia.

England Squad
Steve Aston (Staffordshire), Tony Birbeck (Durham), John Butterworth (Kent), Jason Caunt (Derbyshire), Phil Deakin (Lancashire), Chris Dearden (Lancashire), Montie Douglas (Lincolnshire), Nick Gaywood (Yorkshire), Edward Gordon Lennox (Vice-Captain, Gloucestershire), Mel Hussain (Essex), Richard Merriman (Captain, Derbyshire), Nick Newman (Leicestershire), Michael Palmer (Warwickshire), Jim Phillips (Kent), Simon Routh (Kent), Graham Shaw (Durham), Kevin Watson (Yorkshire), Marcus Young (Essex)

Paul Bradley (Team Manager), Allen Murray (Scorer), Madhan Kumar Ramanathan (Physio), Paolo Iorio (Osteopath), Chris Johnson (International Masters Cricket Umpire Panel), Ian Gorton (Umpire), Keith Boyall (Umpire), Rash Mahmood (Commentator), Mel Mahmood

Reserves: Neil Brathwaite (Essex), Tony Rhodes (Hertfordshire), Lee Selfe (Bedfordshire)

Tournament Information
The tournament is being hosted by India in the city of Chennai.

Monday 19th February – Saturday 2nd March (Knockout stages from Friday 1st March)

Group A: England, New Zealand, Canada, USA, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Rest of the World

Group B: Pakistan, Australia, Wales, India, Sri Lanka, West Indies, Bangladesh

Top two from each group qualify for the semi-finals.

England’s Schedule
Friendly: Madras Cricket Club, Wednesday 14th February
Warmup ODI: India, Friday 16th February
Game One: New Zealand, Monday 19th February
Game Two: Zimbabwe, Tuesday 20th February
Game Three: South Africa, Thursday 22nd February
Game Four: Rest of the World, Friday 23rd February
Game Five: Canada, Monday 27th February
Game Six: USA, Thursday 29th February
Finals: March 1st – March 2nd

The schedule is liable to change.

The friendly against Madras Cricket Club will be taking place at Chepauk Stadium, home of the Chennai Super Kings and Tamil Nadu.

The meeting with India will be the first official ODI between the two sides at Over 60s level.

Extra Information
We are very thankful to all of our sponsors that have made this journey and trip possible, especially our main sponsor Stonehill, who provide all the players and staff with the kit and equipment they require.

In the past year, the team have received extensive media coverage from national and regional outlets on the back of the on field success. Appearances include Sky Sports, talkSPORT, The Times, The Guardian, regional ITV news and regional newspapers.

England Over 60s Twitter https://twitter.com/englandover60s

England Over 60s Instagram https://www.instagram.com/england_cricket_seniors/

England Over 60s Facebook https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100090421426089

England Over 60s Play Cricket https://englandseniors.play-cricket.com/home

The games will be streamed live on YouTube but details are yet to be finalised.

For further details contact :
Paul Bradley (07787 226216/ [email protected]),
Richard Merriman (07801 233570/ [email protected])
or Harrison Burridge (07518 132594/ [email protected]).

Squad for the World Cup

 

 


Sponsors



 
DMS Sports